Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education

SIGSCE 2008
March 12-15, 2008 • Portland, Oregon, USA

SIGCSE 2008 Vendor Sessions


Microsoft: External Research Efforts and Assessment in Education Research

Speaker: Harold Javid, Microsoft

Thursday, March 13, 10:30am-11:45am
Room B117-118

Abstract:

Presentation on MSR's External Research efforts and assessment in Educational Research; ranging from new technologies; TabletPC, Surface, games (XNA GS), robotics (MSRS), computational science, new media and distance education. Harold and his team will be showcasing new educational technologies, results from current initiatives and MSR ER&Ps plans going forward.

Harold Javid, PhD, is Director of Microsoft Research's education research group and manager of the New Faculty Fellows and Microsoft Faculty Summit.

Sun: SunSpots and TrackBots on java.net

Thursday, March 13, 2:00pm-3:15pm
Room B117-118

Abstract:

This session will explain how the academic community can use SunSpot devices as creative learning tools and the java.net online community for class projects. The session will kickoff a SunSpot/TrackBot programming contest.

A brief overview of java.net will be provided followed by an introduction by the java.net Mobile and Embedded Community Leader of the SunSpot, "... an experimental platform to inspire developers to build the next great toy, sensor, communication device ...Sun SPOT devices provide a flexible hardware platform as well as the software and tools to make it easy to innovate, experiment, and prototype whatever a developer can imagine."

The Robotics Community Leader will then show how SunSpots are used to provide the 'application brain' for TrackBots, a small bot "...designed specifically for university-level education and research, based on educational experiences." Included are design goals learned from cockroaches, simulation and development tools and a demonstration of the Greenfoot environment and a TrackBot swarm.

The session will close with a description of how java.net is being used as an inovative platform for teamwork and collaborative development internationally in the academic arena and the announcement of a SunSpot/TrackBot programming contest hosted on java.net.

Google: Getting Started with Cluster Computing for Undergrads

Speakers: Christophe Bisciglia, Google, and Aaron Kimball, University of Washington

Thursday, March 13, 4:00pm-5:15pm
Room B117-118

Abstract:

Cluster computing is an increasingly relevant technology across the computing industry. Until recently, teaching about how to use these systems was difficult to perform at the undergraduate level. New tools such has Hadoop, based on Google's MapReduce architecture, now lower the barrier to entry for students, making it easier for universities to introduce this important topic to their students.

This session will introduce several open source technologies that make cluster computing viable in the classroom. It will also describe highlights from courses already in progress at several schools, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate these components into a course at your own institution. Attendees will learn how to set up clusters using available resources, ideas for cluster computing projects, and thoughts on curriculum development.


Microsoft: Enhance Classroom Experience with Phoenix

Speakers: Andy Ayers (Microsoft Visual Studio/Phoenix) and Yan Xu (Microsoft Research)

Friday, March 14, 10:30am-11:45am
Room B117-118

Abstract:

Phoenix is the code name for the application development framework that is the basis for all future Microsoft compiler technologies. The Phoenix framework can be adapted to read and write binaries and Microsoft Intermediate Language assemblies and represent the input files in an Intermediate Representation, which can be analyzed and manipulated by applications by using the Phoenix API. These extensible features makes Phoenix an ideal tool for teaching software analysis, optimization, and security studies, This tutorial will provide a introduction to Phoenix and walk you through examples of how Phoenix can be used in classrooms to enhance teaching/learning experience.

Intel: Confronting Manycore: Parallel Programming Beyond SMP (multicore is just the beginning...)

Speaker: Michael Wrinn
Senior Course Architect, Intel

Friday, March 14, 10:30am-11:45am
Room B112

Abstract:

Computer processor manufacturers have switched from single core to multicore designs, creating the opportunity (need?) for software to make the corresponding switch, from serial to parallel. The initial multicore chips are straightforward: symmetric, typically with 2 or 4 cores. However, indicators point to a near future of much larger numbers of cores, with the likelihood of specialized cores, complex cache management, and sophisticated communication requirements. Today's multicore software techniques -- primarily threading -- may not be sufficient to utilize these manycore systems efficiently. This talk will explore possible approaches to the challenge.

Bio: Michael Wrinn is a senior course architect in the Intel Software College, where he collaborates with universities to bring parallel computing to the mainstream of undergraduate education. Prior assignments include managing Intel's software engineering lab in Shanghai, and directing the human interface technology research. He was Intel's representative to the committee which produced the first OpenMP specification, and remains active in the parallel computing community. Before joining Intel, Michael worked at Accelrys (San Diego), implementing commercial and research simulation codes on a wide variety of parallel/HPC systems. He holds a Ph.D. (in quantum mechanics) and a B.Sc. (mathematics/chemistry/physics) from McGill University.


Sun: Real World Observability Tools in Computer Science Education

Friday, March 14, 2:00pm-3:15pm
Room B117-118

Abstract:

Join Computer Science professors from around the world as they discuss the ways in which using OpenSolaris has changed their operating system class in our Real World Observability Tools in Computer Science Education session. Three professors from the US, China and the Philippines will briefly share personal experiences and then join a panel discussion.

OS concepts such as memory management, process scheduling, and synchronization, are frequently illustrated with separate programming projects. However, recent developments in open source operating systems (most originating from the OpenSolaris project) provide the capability to observe operating system activity directly in production. In particular, the open source DTrace (Dynamic Tracing) framework, (developed within the Sun's OpenSolaris project and subsequently ported to Apple's OS X) can be incorporated into the CS curriculum, providing new insight into OS behavior under production conditions. Real World Observability Tools in Computer Science Education will include discussion of the use of DTrace in a graduate level OS course at George Mason University's Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering.

Similar work done has been taking place in China. A group of Chinese professors collaborated on a project to incorporate a number of OpenSolaris features, including DTrace, into their OS curriculum. The result was a comprehensive OS Lab curriculum based on DTrace and MDB, OpenSolaris' Modular Debugger. The courseware includes lecture slides, teaching notes, demonstrations, webcasts, and a textbook which is going into publication.

In addition, a group of students in China used DTrace to develop a number of graphical tools illustrating kernel activity. Prof. Chen Xiangqun from Peking University, a leader of this work, will introduce a demonstration of these tools and present the experience of using OpenSolaris to teach OS courses.

Google: Google's CS Education Site

Speaker: Dan Peterson, Google

Friday, March 14, 4:00pm-5:15pm
Room B117-118

Abstract:

Google Code for Educators is a growing repository of Computer Science materials (Creative Commons licensed). This session will begin by walking through the goals of the program and a review of what is currently available. Following that, we'll describe opportunities to get involved as well as have a lively discussion about the priorities for the future. Time permitting, we'll walk through some other academic/research-related programs that Google offers that may be of interest.

Intel: Pacifying the Pandora's Box of Parallelism: Intel's Curriculum Program for Multi-Core and Multithreaded Programming

Speaker: Bev Bachmayer, Intel

Friday, March 14, 4:00pm-5:15pm
Room B112

Abstract:

Parallel and concurrent programming has long been considered a dark and mysterious art relegated to scientific computation and fraught with too many hazards and ills to make it worthwhile for the common programmer to worry about. Besides, historically the hardware to the lead and increased application performance was always just around the corner with the next faster processor. With the production of multi-core chips, parallel execution is now available to everyone and utilizing multiple cores is now the means for getting increased application performance. Software abnd optimization is the key to increased application performance. In 2006 Intel Corp. began focusing on connecting with university faculty with course material and sw tools for use in teaching parallel programming concepts. The next generation of software engineers are already at or just ready to enter university now and must be trained in developing, testing, and tuning parallel and multithreaded programs. This talk will review the Intel Multicore Program which has focused on introducing parallel programming to the undergraduate curriculum. What has worked well and what didn't, what is currently available, the impact the program has had on universities that have participated, and a peek into the future plans and directions.

Bio: Beverley Bachmayer, Intel Software College University Program Manager.
In this role, she is responsible for the global program strategy and implementation, to prepare the next generation of software professionals for upcoming technologies, through helping to expand computer science curricula. Before joining the ISC team, she was the EMEA SAP Onsite Team manager. Bev joined in Intel in 1983 and holds degrees in Computer Science and an MBA.

Cisco: Keeping Your Career Exciting, Interesting and Current: Technology and Training

Speaker: Hollis Johnson, Technical Lead, Cisco Systems Product Security Team

Saturday, March 15, 8:30am-10:10am

Room B117-118

Abstract:

If you think that landing a great job is the end of the story, think again. Working for a great company is one thing, but know that you as an employee are one of their greatest assets. Companies understand that employee retention is greatly increased when employees are given opportunities to grow and develop their careers. Make sure that your career develops in a way that's challenging and keeps you ahead of the crowd and abreast with new technologies. Learn how to leverage the opportunities that the company's own learning organization affords you, as well as by professional development through external educational sponsorship and personal networking.

Microsoft: Comparing Windows and Linux in OS courses

Speaker: Dave Probert, PhD
Kernel Architect, Core OS Division, Microsoft

Saturday, March 15, 11:00am-12:15pm
Room B117-118

Abstract:

The presentation provides a top-level overview of kernel architecture, using Windows to teach OS, and how Windows fundamentally differs from Linux.

Dave Probert is a kernel architect within the Windows Core Operating Systems Division at Microsoft where he is currently working on the next generations of Windows. Dave is also the architect for the Windows Academic Program, developing both the WRK package and ProjectOZ. Previously Dave managed kernel development for Windows, starting with the Windows 2000 release. Dave joined Microsoft in 1996, after earning his Ph.D. in Electrical & Computer Engineering at UC Santa Barbara developing the SPACE project with Prof. John Bruno. His prior industry experience includes serving as Vice President of Software Engineering at Culler Scientific Systems, consulting for various companies on UNIX kernel internals, and working as a systems architect at Burroughs corporation designing hardware and writing microcode for the B1900.