Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code

Identity & Computing Lecture Series: Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing
Speaker Name
Dr. Ruha Benjamin
Date and Time
-
Location
Virtual, registration is required
Abstract

This third lecture in the Identity & Computing Lecture Series: Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing welcomes Dr. Ruha Benjamin, and will examine the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development.

Register HERE

About the Identity & Computing Lecture Series: Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing:
Both computing departments and tech organizations have long struggled with creating equitable and inclusive environments for people of diverse identities. Both 2021 and 2021 highlighted the dangers of not understanding identity and its impact on computing environments as well as technology. The Identity & Computing Lecture Series features guest speakers with expertise in topics related to identity and computing.

Each event will be held live via Zoom and is open to all members of the Duke community (faculty, staff, and students).

This series is funded by the Duke Office for Faculty Advancement's Faculty Seed Grant (led by PI Dr. Nicki Washington and Co-PI Dr. Xiaowei Yang).

Short Biography

Ruha Benjamin is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press). She has studied the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine for over fifteen years and speaks widely on issues of innovation, equity, health, and justice in the U.S. and globally. She is also a Faculty Associate in the Center for Information Technology Policy; Program on History of Science; Center for Health and Wellbeing; Program on Gender and Sexuality Studies; Department of Sociology; and serves on the Executive Committees for the Program in Global Health and Health Policy and Center for Digital Humanities. Ruha is the recipient of many awards and honors, including the 2017 President's Award for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton.

Her second book, Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, examines the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development. She is also the editor of Captivating Technology. Race After Technology was awarded Brooklyn Public Library’s 2020 Nonfiction Prize.

She is currently working on her next book, Viral Justice: How We Grow the World We Want, born out of the twin plagues of COVID-19 and police violence—a double crisis that has since created a portal for rethinking all that we’ve taken for granted about the social order and life on this planet.

Host
Nicki Washington, Duke Computer Science and Duke Faculty Advancement