Scaling Up Live Pop-Up Fact Checking

Our society is struggling with an unprecedented amount of falsehoods, hyperboles, and half-truths that do harm to democracy, health, economy, and national security. Fact-checking is a vital defense against this onslaught, perhaps now more than ever. Despite the rise of fact-checking efforts globally, fact-checkers find themselves increasingly overwhelmed and their messages difficult to reach some segments of the public. Our overall project seeks to leverage the power of data and computing to help make fact-checking and dissemination of fact-checks to the public more effective, scalable, and sustainable.

In particular, this summer team supported scalable “pop-up” fact-checking, which in real-time identifies checked claims while media streams, social network feeds, and website contents are being consumed. The team tackled the challenges that arise in deploying the system for live events and scaling it up to a large number of concurrent users. Some specific ideas included audio fingerprinting to identify live events being watched, aggregating live usage data to identify new check-worthy claims, and a subscription service to notify users as soon as a previously encountered claim is checked.

Participating Students

Min Soo Kim

Min Soo Kim
Hometown: Irvine, California. Major: Computer Science / Japanese. Pop-up fact checking seems extremely relevant in today's society and I hope to make some difference. After graduating, I hope I can get a job developing software.


JJ Jiang

JJ Jiang
JJ is from Toronto, Canada with the tentative, unofficial majors of Economics, Psychology and Sociology. She hopes to study the intersection of business, technology and society. She is interested in this project because of it explores the role of technology as service.


Photo not available

Sanha Lim


Jack Proudfoot

Jack Proudfoot
Hi, I'm Jack! I'm an ECE/CS major from Hunterdon, NJ. Growing up I had a very active imagination and I loved to spend my free time reading books and playing with legos. I also really enjoyed school and particularly enjoyed the activities that encouraged creative problem solving. Although I didn't realize it at the time, when I was introduced to computer programming in middle school I was given an avenue to further explore the same types of creative problem solving that I loved as a young kid. Throughout middle school and high school I developed a passion for computer science that led me to want to study it in college. I hope that through my project this summer I can put my experience towards solving a real issue in the world and I hope that I am presented with similar opportunities throughout the rest of my time at Duke and beyond.


Frank Geng

Frank Geng
Hi all! I am Frank Geng, an international student from Nanjing, China. I am a rising sopophore intending to double major in Computer Science and Statistics. The Code+ program allows me to dive deeper into things I like during the summer and meet people of similar interests. In Code+ and future study at Duke, I wish I can gain more experience in doing projects and implement coding skills to solve real-world problems. This goal will also guide me through future careers. Can't wait to see you all in summer!


Posters

Our undergraduate summer program concluded August 2, 2019 with a research showcase and projects fair which featured posters demonstrating what our students have been doing all summer.

Undergrad Summer Research Poster Fair: Automated Pop-up Fact Checking
Summer Research Showcase: Automated Pop-up Fact Checking Project – participating students

Fact-Checking2 Undergrad Summer Research Poster Fair
Summer Research Showcase: Pop-up Fact Checking Project – additional participant, faculty

Fact-Checking2 Undergrad Summer Research Poster Fair
Summer Research Showcase: Fingerprinting for Real-Time Audio Stream Alignment Project Team


Presentations

On July 19 at the end of week 7 of their 10-week summer program developing research projects with computer science faculty, students presented their results to date. The audience was comprised of about 100 people, including students and mentors from Data+, Code+, and SUPICS, the summer undergraduate projects in computer science. Below, JJ Jiang presents with her teammates (from left to right: Jack Proudfoot, Sanha Lim, and Frank Gang) on their summer project building scalable techniques for fact-checking real time speech.

Fact Checking July 19 Presentations